The Magic of Stories

Stories define context, connect people and entertain.  They lend experiences, solutions and inspiration.

Blogs are stories.  Blogger, Blogger, what magic then, do you weave?

Some quotes below.  Hope you enjoy them!

“Fairy tales are more than true: not because they tell us that dragons (problems) exist, but because they tell us that dragons (problems) can be beaten.” Neil Gaiman, Coraline

“Whatever story you want to tell, tell it at the right size.”  Richard Linklater

“A need to tell and hear stories is essential to the species Homo sapiens – second in necessity apparently after nourishment and before love and shelter. Millions survive without love or home, almost none in silence; the opposite of silence leads quickly to narrative, and the sound of story is the dominant sound of our lives….”   Reynold Price.

Laura_Muntz_Lyall_-_Interesting_Story

“At all ages, if is used well by the author and meets the right reader, it has the same power: to generalize while remaining concrete, to present in palpable form not concepts or even experiences but whole classes of experience, and to throw off irrelevancies. But at its best it can do more; it can give us experiences we have never had and thus, instead of ‘commenting on life,’ can add to it.” C.S. Lewis

“Wherever my story takes me, however dark and difficult the theme, there is always some hope and redemption, not because readers like happy endings, but because I am an optimist at heart. I know the sun will rise in the morning, that there is a light at the end of every tunnel.”  Michael Morpurgo

Image Credits:  Deutsche Post AG, Laura Muntz Lyall

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “The Magic of Stories”

    1. Thank you for your comments, Rosaliene. Agree, redemption is a key theme. Being both instructive and providing some extent of healing, its magic can shape mindsets (and the world) positively, perhaps end any repeating cycle of dark thoughts.

      Like

  1. With the opportunity provided by Rosaliene’s comment, am taking this window to profess that I see Reynold’s note more fitting and useful as an observation, rather than the inevitable (the critique to Reynold’s is along similar lines to the naturalistic fallacy/is-ought argument). Of course, as normal, other views are welcome!

    Like

Please Share Your Views!

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s